Follow and Like
SOTA CBD Facebook pages
SOTA CBD instagram page
SOTA CBD twitter page
SOTA CBD Pinterest page
SOTA CBD YouTube page

©2019 by SOTA Health Supplements LLC.  PRODUCTS CONTAINING ZERO (0.00%) THC IS LEGAL IN ALL 50 STATES.

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease. Always check with your physician before starting a new dietary supplement program.  This product is not for use by or sale to persons under the age of 18. This product should be used only as directed on the label. It should not be used if you are pregnant or nursing.All trademarks and copyrights are property of their respective owners and are not affiliated with nor do they endorse this product.   By using this site, you agree to follow the Privacy Policy and all Terms & Conditions printed on this site. Void Where Prohibited by Law.

Everything you need to know about CBD

CBD has become a craze but most people know very little more about CBD and why they should consider taking it.  If do not already know, it comes from the hemp plant and it’s believed to be very good for your health, but we'll get into that in more detail below.  As a consumer, CBD has the potential to be a great source of healing and daily wellness.  Yet for all the potential healing that could come with CBD, there are still many questions about what CBD actually is, why its important and is it really legal.  Like many people, they think CBD was a type of marijuana or something illegal, especially when you hear about grandma at Disney World getting arrested for having CBD.   We have extensively read and researched CBD, including everywhere online, and one thing is clear...there is a ton of conflicting stories and information, so I decided to set the CBD facts straight here!  Hopefully as you read through this, we have put this into terms that you can understand and explain to others so that we change the misleading information into well informed and useful.

Let's Start with the Facts

Does CBD get you high?

Fact: Despite what you may have read, CBD does not get you high.  THC is the psycho-active compound that creates the “high” associated with marijuana.  The majority of good CBD suppliers derive their CBD from the hemp plant and not the marijuana plant.

Fiction:  All CBD comes from hemp.  This is a misunderstanding.  There are several sellers of CBD that do not know what they are selling.  You can derive CBD from marijuana and if you are not buying from a reputable source, you could be ingesting THC (where you will feel a high) and you are potentially breaking the law.  

Is CBD oil the same as hemp oil?

Fact: CBD oil is an oil that contains Cannabidiol. CBD is extracted from a cannabis plant and usually combined with a base oil (often olive, coconut or MCT).  Raw CBD oil looks more like jelly (see picture), so in order to get the proper dosing, it is diluted with a carrier oil.  

Fiction: Hemp oil contains CBD.  This is false!  Hemp oil on the other hand is extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant and does not contain CBD, or any other cannabinoids. Hemp oil is associated with its own list of health benefits. Hemp oil can also be used as a carrier oil to dilute for dosing.

Is hemp oil EXTRACT the same as CBD?

Fact: CBD oil is an oil that contains Cannabidiol. CBD is extracted from a cannabis plant and usually combined with a base oil (often olive, coconut or MCT).  Raw CBD oil looks more like jelly (see picture), so in order to get the proper dosing, it is diluted with a carrier oil.  

Fiction: Hemp oil contains CBD.  This is false!  Hemp oil is extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant and does not contain CBD, or any other cannabinoids. Hemp oil is associated with its own list of health benefits. Hemp oil can also be used as a carrier oil to dilute for dosing.  Do not be confused with hemp oil and hemp oil extract.

What exactly is Cannabis?

Cannabis is one of a genus of plants known as Cannabaceae. There are two main species of cannabis that are cultivated for human consumption, namely Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa. 


Sativa plants are taller and produce more fiber and are therefore the species from which hemp cultivation arose. Indica plants are shorter and bushier and less suitable for farming for either industrial purposes or for production of food, but well-suited for producing medical marijuana.

What is the differences between Hemp and Marijuana?

Marijuana is high in the psychoactive compound THC, or delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, the compound in marijuana that causes a high.


Marijuana is rightly considered to be a “drug.” It is cultivated mainly for medicinal and “recreational” purposes. Both indica and sativa strains, as well as hybrids of the two, are used to produce marijuana.


The United States federal government considers marijuana to be a Class I controlled substance. However, many U.S. states have instituted legislation to regulate its cultivation and allow its use as medicine. Some states have also legalized marijuana for recreational use.


Hemp is not marijuana. Although hemp does contain some cannabinoids, it has negligible amounts of THC. In fact, in order to be legally cultivated, industrial hemp must contain less than 0.3% THC. Industrial hemp is often grown for food and fibers. Most industrial hemp contains relatively small concentrations of cannabinoids and terpenes and is not the most desirable source of CBD oil.


While many of the CBD products on the market are produced from this kind of industrial hemp, the CBD oil in our products is made from a CBD-rich strain known as PCR hemp. PCR is short for phytocannabinoid rich — it contains as much as ten times the concentration of CBD as generic industrial hemp and negligible amounts of THC. It does not cause a high, and is therefore not considered a drug

What exactly is CBD Oil?

CBD is short for cannabidiol. It is just one of many different molecules called cannabinoids that are found in the cannabis plant. CBD oil is a natural oil which is extracted from the flowers and leaves of the cannabis plant. It is used by people all over the world as a dietary supplement and for a variety of purposes.  CBD is not an acronym. Cannabidiol has been shortened to CBD simply because it’s customary for cannabinoids to have a three-letter designation, such as THC for tetrahydrocannabinol, CBG for cannabigerol, CBN for cannabinol and so forth. THC is arguably the most famous member of the cannabinoids family — it’s the one that causes a high, and it’s mostly found in marijuana. 


Broad spectrum CBD oil contains a variety of active compounds such as cannabinoids and terpenes. Depending on the formulation of a product, it may contain other beneficial components such as omega fatty acids, amino acids, vitamins and minerals.

What Are Cannabinoids?

Cannabinoids are active compounds produced by all cannabis plants. They account for most of the benefits of cannabis. Cannabinoids found in plants are technically called phytocannabinoids. Phytocannabinoids mimic compounds which we call endocannabinoids that are produced naturally by all mammals.

 

  • Phytocannabinoids — Cannabinoids produced by plants.

  • Endocannabinoids — Cannabinoids produced by human or other mammal bodies.

Other cannabinoids found in PCR hemp include cannabichromene (CBC) and cannabigerol (CBG). Cannabichromene (CBC) is the third most common cannabinoid found in cannabis. Like CBD, cannabichromene is non-psychoactive. Cannabigerol (CBG) is produced early on in the hemp’s growth cycle. Both CBC and CBG are believed to have properties similar to those of CBD.

What Do Endocannabinoids Do?

Endocannabinoids, those produced naturally by our bodies, are signaling molecules. They are technically called neurotransmitters. Hormones are a more familiar type of neurotransmitter.


A vast array of neurotransmitters are produced by the nervous system in response to various states of health and also environmental factors. They interact with receptors found on the surface of cells throughout our bodies. Their job is to instruct a cell to adjust its activities. This can include changing how cells react to other neurotransmitters.
In order to illustrate how neurotransmitters work, let’s use an analogy.


The brain doesn’t connect with every cell in your body, just like traffic officers can’t connect directly with every car on the road to be able to instruct individual drivers how to behave in every traffic situation. In order to manage traffic, we implement traffic signals. These include street signs, traffic lights, the lines on the road and so on. Traffic signals inform drivers where they can and cannot travel, when they should stop and when they should go and how fast they are allowed to move.


Some of these signals can sense what’s going on in the environment, such as when a car pulls up to a traffic light. The sensor triggers a controller, causing the light to change, thereby changing the behavior of the drivers approaching that intersection.


In the same way, your body’s nervous system connects to a wide variety of sensors to keep track of every system in your body. The signals from these sensors are decoded by the brain and the nervous system. If it is determined that a system has gone out of balance, the nervous system produces neurotransmitters, which travel through the bloodstream and interact with receptors on cells, instructing them to adjust their behavior.

What Is The Human Endocannabinoid System (ECS)?

Now that we understand how neurotransmitters work to adjust our cellular activity, let’s take a look at the role of cannabinoids in particular and their role in supporting homeostasis, a state of balance, within the body.


The human endocannabinoid system (ECS) has two components. First is the endocannabinoid receptors found on the surface of cells throughout the body. Second is the endocannabinoids themselves that interact with those receptors.
 

For example, a well-known endocannabinoid is called anandamide. Anandamide is responsible for the production and uptake of serotonin. Serotonin is often referred to as the “bliss molecule” because levels of serotonin in the body are directly associated with mood. Serotonin is the neurotransmitter which is responsible for “runner’s high.” Serotonin levels are often low in people suffering from depression and anxiety.


The endocannabinoid system is vast and far-reaching. It regulates a wide array of bodily functions, from appetite regulation to sleep patterns, moods, metabolism, immune response, the lifespan of cells and much more.

What Are Terpenes?

Terpenes are a class of volatile hydrocarbon compounds produced by the cannabis plant as well as most other plants. However, cannabis is currently the most terpene-dense plant known to humans. Terpenes readily evaporate at room temperature and our noses are highly sensitive to them.


Terpenes are recognized as safe for human consumption by the Food and Drug Association and are used in a wide variety of food and cosmetic products.


In nature, terpenes act as both a repellent for pests and as attractants for pollinators and seed spreaders. In cannabis, terpenes are produced in the highest concentrations in the plant’s female flowers. Although terpene molecules are all very similar, each has its own unique scent and flavor. Various combinations of terpenes are responsible for the distinct aromas of cannabis strains.


Terpenes can also have powerful effects on our bodies. In fact, terpenes have been utilized by humans for millennia in what’s commonly known as aromatherapy. For example, the scent of citrus is produced primarily by a combination of limonene and pinene, both of which are thought to elevate mood.


Some common terpenes include linalool, myrcene, caryophyllene, limonene, terpinolene, citronellol and camphene. The traditional uses of these terpenes and others vary, but they include use as support for muscle and joint function, mood and overall wellness.  Terpenes also act on cannabinoid receptors and are known to modify the effects of cannabinoids.

I have heard of The Entourage Effect...What is that?

Although not as potent as cannabinoids in terms of their overall effects, terpenes are valuable components of cannabis.
The overall effect of the rich combination of cannabinoids and terpenes is known as the entourage effect. In the case of cannabis, these cannabinoids and terpenes work together to produce a range of effects which is thought to be greater than the sum of its individual components.


More research is needed to determine the exact role that terpenes play in the overall effects of CBD oil, but it seems clear that terpenes work in concert with cannabinoids to produce a richer effect than CBD alone.